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Rotator Cuff Pain

The rotator cuff consists of a group of tendons and muscles that surround and stabilize the shoulder joint. These tendons allow a wide range of movement of the shoulder joint across multiple planes. Irritation or injury to these tendons can result in rotator cuff pain.

Rotator Cuff Tear

A rotator cuff is a group of tendons in the shoulder joint that provides support and enables a wide range of motion. A major injury to these tendons may result in rotator cuff tears. It is one of the most common causes of shoulder pain in middle-aged and older individuals.

Shoulder Labral Tear

Traumatic injury to the shoulder or overuse of the shoulder (throwing, weightlifting) may cause the labrum to tear. In addition, aging may weaken the labrum leading to injury.

Shoulder Instability

Shoulder instability is a chronic condition that causes frequent dislocation of the shoulder joint.

Rotator Cuff Bursitis

The rotator cuff is a set of muscles and tendons which hold the various bones of the shoulder joint together, providing strength and support. Inflammation of the bursa, a fluid-filled sac between the rotator cuff tendons and a bony process at the top of the shoulder called the acromion, is known as shoulder bursitis or rotator cuff bursitis. It is often accompanied by inflammation of the tendons or rotator cuff tendonitis. The inflamed bursae and tendons can become compressed between the bones of the acromion and the upper arm, which is called shoulder impingement.

Shoulder Dislocation

Sports that involve overhead movements and repeated use of the shoulder at your workplace may lead to sliding of the upper arm bone from the glenoid. The dislocation might be a partial dislocation (subluxation) or a complete dislocation causing pain and shoulder joint instability. The shoulder joint often dislocates in the forward direction (anterior instability), and sometimes in the backward or downward direction.

Shoulder Impingement

Shoulder impingement is the inflammation of the tendons of the shoulder joint. It is one of the most common causes of pain in the shoulder. Shoulder impingement is also called swimmer’s shoulder, tennis shoulder or rotator cuff tendinitis.

Shoulder Ligament Injuries

Shoulder ligament injuries are injuries to the tough elastic tissues present around the shoulder that connect bones to each other and stabilize the joint. The ligaments present in the shoulder are connected to the ends of the scapula, humerus, and clavicle bones which form the shoulder complex. The extensive stretching or tearing of these ligaments from acute or chronic injuries can lead to instability in the shoulder joint.

Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

SAIS is the inflammation and irritation of your rotator cuff tendons. This occurs when the tendons rub against the outer end of the shoulder blade (the acromion) while passing through the subacromial space during shoulder movement.

Internal Impingement of the Shoulder

Internal shoulder impingement can be described as a pathological condition resulting from repetitive impingement of the internal surface of the rotator cuff by the bones at the back of the glenohumeral joint.

Rotator Cuff Re-tear

Rotator cuff repair is a surgery to repair an injured or torn rotator cuff. A re-tear may occur a few years after surgery due to multiple reasons including aging, a massive previous tear (more than 5cm), fatty degradation of the tendons, inflammatory arthritis, and inappropriate rehabilitation.

Partial Rotator Cuff Tear

A partial rotator cuff tear is an incomplete tear that involves damage to a part of the tendon. The tear can be at the top, bottom or inner side of the tendon and does not go all the way through the tendon completely.

Shoulder Labral Tear with Instability

The shoulder consists of a ball-and-socket joint formed by the upper end of the humerus (upper arm bone) and a cavity in the shoulder blade called the glenoid. The glenoid cavity is surrounded by a rim of cartilage called the labrum. The labrum adds depth to the cavity making the joint more stable and positions the ball within the socket.

Rotator Cuff Repair

Rotator cuff repair is a surgery to repair an injured or torn rotator cuff. It is usually performed arthroscopically on an outpatient basis. An arthroscope, a small, fiber-optic instrument consisting of a lens, light source, and video camera. The camera projects images of the inside of the joint onto a large monitor, allowing your doctor to look for any damage, assess the type of injury and repair it. Large rotator cuff tears may require open surgery.

Revision Rotator Cuff Surgery

Revision rotator cuff surgery is a procedure done to repair a re-tear in the rotator cuff after a failed initial rotator cuff surgery. The revision surgery is generally more complex, as it attempts to repair a rotator cuff that has been torn multiple times.

Biologic Shoulder Resurfacing

Biologic shoulder resurfacing is a surgical procedure in which only the diseased part of your joint is replaced with a biological graft, rather than the complete joint with a metal or plastic prosthesis as seen in traditional shoulder replacement. The procedure involves resurfacing of the degenerated or arthritic articular surfaces of your shoulder joint with a healthy tissue graft taken from a donor (allograft) and acts as an alternative to traditional shoulder replacement.

Ultrasound-Guided Shoulder Injections

An ultrasound is a common imaging technique that employs high-frequency sound waves to create images of organs and other internal structures of the body. These images provide valuable information about the underlying pathology of tissues and assists with diagnosis and planning the treatment of a condition. The ultrasound provides a clear view of organs, tendons, muscles and joints, and any associated disorders.

Viscosupplementation for Shoulder Arthritis

Viscosupplementation is a minimally invasive procedure that involves the injection of a hyaluronic acid preparation into the shoulder to treat arthritis. Hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring substance which is present in the joint fluid that acts as a shock absorber and enhances lubrication.

Exercises for Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

Shoulder impingement syndrome is a common condition seen in athletes and individuals who perform a lot of overhead arm movements. This activity results in irritation of the rotator cuff tendon as it repeatedly rubs against the acromion, which is the bony process of the shoulder blade.